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Public Records Request

Public Records Request
Indicate whether the record(s) is/are to be used for: *

Non-Commercial Public Records

Non-Commercial Requests

1.) Any person may request to examine or be furnished copies, printouts or photographs of any public record during regular office hours (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday – Friday).

2.) To request inspection and/or copies, printouts of photographs of public records, please complete the top portion of the form on the reverse, and present it to the department that has the records requested. Please be specific so that the records can be easily identified.

3.) The City will charge an amount per page approximately equal to the cost of reproducing the requested material. Such amount should normally be paid prior to receipt of the materials. Any checks should be made payable to: City of Nogales

Address
Address
Street
Apt/Suite/Trlr #
City
State
Zip

Commercial Public Records

Commercial Requests

1.) If the request is for commercial purposes, the bottom gray portion of the form should be completed and notarized. A “commercial purpose” is:

Use of public record for purpose of sale or resale or for the purpose of producing a document containing all or part of the copy, printout or photograph for sale or the obtaining of names and addresses form such public records for the purpose of solicitation or the sale of such names and addresses to another for the purpose of solicitation or for any purpose in which the purchaser can reasonably anticipate the receipt of monetary gain from the director or indirect use of such public record.

2.) Charges for a commercial request shall include:

a.) A portion of the cost to the City for obtaining the original or copies of the documents, printout or photographs to be reproduced,

b.) A reasonable fee for the cost of time, equipment, and personnel in making the copies, and

c.) The value of the reproduction on the commercial project

3.) Please note that if the requestor obtains records for a commercial purpose without indicating the commercial purpose, or if he or she obtains the records for a non-commercial purpose, and then uses or allows the use of the records for a commercial purpose, he or she will be liable for damages in the use of the records for commercial purpose, he or she will be liable for damages in the amount of three times what the City could have charged had it known, plus costs and attorneys fees. A.R.S § 39-121.03(C). If a false statement is given, the requester can also be guilty of a felony. A.R.S. § 39.161.

Address
Address
Street
Apt/Suite/Trlr #
City
State
Zip
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Open Meeting Information

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Claim Request Form

Claim Request Form

1. Claimant Information

Address *
Address
City
State
Zip

2. Occurrence or Events Giving Rise to the Claim

Was a police report filed? *

Description of Property Damage and Injuries

Witnesses

By signing you verify the information presented in this claim is to the best of your knowledge and belief.
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Clerk

City Ordinances

What is an Ordinance?

An ordinance is a law passed by a municipal government. A municipality, such as a city, town, village, or borough, is a political subdivision of a state within which a municipal corporation has been established to provide local government to a population in a defined area.

Ordinances constitute the subject matter of municipal law. The power of municipal governments to enact ordinances is derived from the state constitution or statutes or through the legislative grant of a municipal charter. The charter in large part dictates how much power elected officials have to regulate actions within the municipality. Municipalities that have been granted “home rule” charters by the legislature have the most authority to act. If, however, a municipality enacts an ordinance that exceeds its charter or is in conflict with state or federal law, the ordinance can be challenged in court and ruled void.

Many ordinances deal with maintaining public safety, health, morals, and General Welfare. For example, a municipality may enact housing ordinances that set minimum standards of habitability. Other ordinances deal with fire and safety regulations that residential, commercial, and industrial property owners must follow. Many municipalities have enacted noise ordinances, which prohibit prescribed levels of noise after certain hours of the evening.

Ordinances may also deal with public streets and sidewalks. They typically include regulations regarding parking, snow removal, and littering. Restrictions on pets, including “pooper scooper” and leash laws, are also governed by municipal ordinances.

One of the most significant areas of municipal law is Zoning. Zoning ordinances constitute a master plan for land use within the municipality. A municipality is typically divided into residential, commercial, and industrial zoning districts. Zoning attempts to conserve the value of property and to encourage the most appropriate use of land throughout a particular locality.

In the past, many U.S. municipalities enacted a variety of ordinances regulating public morals and behavior. Many, such as ordinances that prohibited spitting on a public sidewalk, have been repealed or are rarely enforced.

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Clerk

City Charter